Thursday, 27 October 2016

Milky Way Blowout

One of the biggest mysteries in cosmology is the "missing mass problem". When everything in the visible universe was totted up during the 20th century, it became clear that something was amiss. There simply wasn't enough matter in creation to explain how the structure of everything was maintained, seeing as it was theorized to be held together by the mutual gravitation fields of all objects. This was long after Albert Einstein had rejected his "cosmological constant- lambda", an unobserved force he originally believed formed the foundations of the universe before changing his mind, see: https://rutube.ru/video/cf8091645e2e9624e7ea80dc8b2bb68e/. Assuming gravity was still involved in the process, cosmologists then theorized that the universe was filled with "dark matter", a form of matter very different to that we are familiar with, but it makes up almost a full quarter of the entire cosmos. It does not emit or interact with electromagnetic radiation in any way, making it completely invisible; yet it does have mass and a gravitational field like ordinary matter. However a new discovery has called that into question. Our home galaxy, the Milky Way, is about a hundred thousand light-years across and contains almost half a trillion stars; and at its centre is a huge black hole called "Sagittarius A". Black holes are believed to be stars that have collapsed after a supernova to the point where their gravity rips a hole in space-time and becomes a singularity, an indefinable point of zero volume and infinite mass. Everything that comes close enough to a black hole gets sucked in and destroyed, even light itself. This is why it looks completely black. Scientists like John Taylor regard black holes as the most destructive force in the universe and even claim one day the entire cosmos might be devoured by them. Yet for something that has such a huge force of attraction, it's amazing how much black holes radiate and repel. Sagittarius A itself has one of the biggest radio signatures in the sky. This is thought to be the explosion of matter being crushed out of existence as it enters the black hole, but is it? Stephen Hawking has also postulated that black holes radiate energy to the point where it eventually dissolves them; he immodestly named this energy "Hawking radiation". Now an astronomer called Prof. Fabrizio Nicastro says he and his team have found another source to explain the missing mass problem, at least as far as the Milky Way goes. At the centre of our galaxy is a huge bubble of gaseous fog. It is very hot, a million degrees and very big, about 40,000 light-years in diameter. It emerged from the black hole about six million years ago. That sounds like a long time, indeed it is when the first proto-human apes evolved on Earth; but in cosmological timescales that's just yesterday. It must be growing fast to have reached such a gigantic size in such a short time, flowing outward at a third of a percent the speed of light, that's three thousand miles per second. It must be fueled by a vast amount of energy. The scientists say that all this energy came entirely from the black hole "feeding", but did it? Source: http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2016/08/milky-way-had-blowout-bash-6-million-years-ago/. Dr Manjir Samanta-Laughton used to present the Hidden Science show on The People's Voice and she's been a guest on HPANWO Radio, see: http://hpanwo-radio.blogspot.co.uk/2014/06/programme-89-podcast-manjir-samanta.html and: http://hpanwo-radio.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/programme-13-podcast-manjir-samanta.html. Her theory on the nature of black holes is radically different. She believes that they are a creative force, not a destructive one. They add matter and energy to the universe instead of removing it. The pattern made by spiral galaxies, like the Milky Way, is caused by the rotating super-massive black hole spewing material out into space; solids, water and gas. This is what generates the shape. The spiral galaxy looks like a Catherine wheel firework which spins round spraying out burning gunpowder in the very same way, although obviously on a vastly smaller scale. Prof. Chocolate Chip Cornetto, or whatever his name is, should take a look at Manjir's ideas before publishing his paper. He might learn a thing or two that would make his work even more groundbreaking.

3 comments:

Xylomet said...

This is an interesting excerpt from Jeff Mills Albumn Sleeve 'The Free Fall Galaxy' The Free Fall Galaxy is what we would call a cosmic menace - a threat to all that it encounters. The album is a journey of survival to go through the unknown universe, which leads to look deep into ourselves for answers if there is a Future.'.......................

Ben Emlyn-Jones said...

I've just Googled it, X. Very CERNy indeed! It reminds me a bit of the final scene in Disney's film The Black Hole.

Laurence said...

Excellent article Ben. (I am sorry I missed the piece when it was first published.) There is not much hope, IMO, of establishment academics referencing a privateer these days, unfortunately, no matter how apposite. Nevertheless, I for one concur that it is difficult to comprehend that a black hole should reverse, diametrically, the energy vector. It goes to show the closed mindedness of modern atheistic science.